Monday, May 1, 2017

How to Care for Your Brain

Your body isn’t the only thing growing older, your brain is aging too. Do yourself a favor and care for it – you won’t regret it. These articles will help you out!

Your Brain Ages Just Like Your Body—Here's How To Keep It Young

“Humans spend a lot of time trying to slow down aging from the outside—we buy expensive face creams, spend hours primping in the mirror, and even turn to plastic surgery. But the fact is our brains age just like our bodies do—only the mental side effects can significantly erode our quality of life. And according to Reader's Digest, our brains start slowing down at the tender age of 30. On the bright side, the magazine also offers up some tips for delaying or even reversing this aging process, as informed by various doctors, psychologists, neuropsychologists, and more. To stave off memory loss and cognitive decline, make a point to do the following three things for brain health every day:”

What Is The No. 1 Way To Keep Your Brain Sharp?

“Every week, there seems to be another new study reaffirming the neuroprotective brain benefits of physical activity and aerobic exercise. This week is no exception.
For anyone who reads The Athlete’s Way blog posts regularly, I apologize for sounding like a broken record when it comes to the cognitive benefits of exercise. I know you've heard it all before.
That said, as a public health advocate, finding empirical evidence to motivate people to be more physically active is my raison d'être and the ultimate goal of this blog. In my mind, there is no greater motivation to exercise than the power of physical activity to keep your brain sharp.”

Scientists Discovered A Simple Way To Keep Your Brain Young As You Age

“We all want brains that function at their best, today, tomorrow, and — we hope — for the rest of our lives. What can we do to make that happen?
To try and answer that question, scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital studied 17 ‘superagers,’ people over 65 who have the mental function of those in their 20s.
The goal was to find out if there were any observable differences between superager brains and normal brains, and if so, whether the rest of us could use that information to give ourselves better brain function through the years.
The answers are yes and yes.”

No comments:

Post a Comment